Uncategorized

Read e-book Judgment: A Faerie Justice Story

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Judgment: A Faerie Justice Story file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Judgment: A Faerie Justice Story book. Happy reading Judgment: A Faerie Justice Story Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Judgment: A Faerie Justice Story at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Judgment: A Faerie Justice Story Pocket Guide.

The West of Ireland is peculiarly sacred to ancient superstitions of the Sidhe race. There is a poetry in the scenery that touches the heart of the people; they love the beautiful glens, the mountains rising like towers from the sea, the islands sanctified by the memory of a saint, and the green hills where Finvarra holds his court. Every lake and mountain has its legend of the spirit-land, some holy traditions of a saint, or some historic memory of a national hero who flourished in the old great days when Ireland had native chiefs and native swords to guard her; and amongst the Western Irish, especially, the old superstitions of their forefathers are reverenced with a solemn faith and fervour that is almost a religion.

Finvarra the king is still believed to rule over all the fairies of the west, and Onagh is the fairy queen. Her golden hair sweeps the ground, and she is robed in silver gossamer all glittering as if with diamonds, but they are dew-drops that sparkle over it. The queen is more beautiful than any woman of earth, yet Finrarra loves the mortal women best, and wiles them down to his fairy palace by the subtle charm of the fairy music , for no one who has heard it can resist its power, and they are fated to belong to the fairies ever after.

Even after their conversion to Christianity, the Irish continued to believe that most people when they died waited for the Last Judgment inside one or another Faerie mound. Still another group of theories assumes that Faeries are dwindled gods , who through many generations of people retelling their myths, go from being deities to nature spirits, especially after the coming of Christianity. Regardless of where they came from, Faeries have a culture and social organization just as humans do.

They can be divided into two orders: the Trooping Faeries and the Solitary Faeries. The Trooping Faeries are gregarious and live in communal groups, usually under mounds or hills, or in dwellings in Faerieland itself. Their social structure closely imitates that of Humanity, with aristocrats the so-called Heroic Faeries , rustic folk, and the gentry.

All Faeries love making music and dancing, even the Solitaries and the evil ones, and all Troopers enjoy rades , solemn processions on foot or on horseback. However, the Heroics are particularly keen for hunts, battle, and sporting matches. The aristocrats are the most powerful; they are also the most beautiful. They mimic human aristocracy, in that they have kings, knights, ladies, and royal courts, with feasts and balls. The rustics are the weakest, and they most closely resemble human peasants. The gentry are in between, much like the human gentry. They are not as gallant or sophisticated as the Heroics, but are generally more refined than the rustics.

They enjoy some of the same leisure activities as the Heroics, particularly sports and games, but they must work like the rustics.

Log in to your Gumroad account

They are the Faeries who most often interact with humans, and many are half-human or have human ancestry. The Solitary Faeries are, as their title implies, loners and individualistic, but some do come together on occasion to have meetings or hold fairs. They are generally less kindly disposed towards people than the Troopers, but only the evil ones are truly inimical. Though some resemble the aristocrats and most the gentry or the rustics, they have no formal social structure as the Troopers do.

Most are as powerful as the gentry and a few are as strong as the Heroics. In fact, there is little they share in common as a group, except that they can be found almost anywhere and they have no formal dwellings. They can be divided into two smaller orders, the domesticated Solitaries and the wild Solitaries, but the distinction between these is often blurred. A domestic Faerie lives with humans and helps with the work, whereas a wild Faerie lives in nature and protects it from human encroachment.

However, some domestic Faeries only cause trouble and some wild Faeries help with herding and harvest.


  • Featured Books.
  • Medical Language.
  • Faerie Queene.
  • Can I Really Publish a Decent Book With Microsoft Word? YES, with this book. (Silver Sands Publishing Series).

Also, a domestic Faerie can go wild if insulted, spied upon, thanked, or given a gift of clothing, while a wild Faerie can be made into a staunch friend and valuable ally by showing it kindness or doing it a favor. However, there are some wild Faeries who are so dangerous they should not even be befriended. Faeries tend to live completely independent lives. They ride, revel, dance, play sports and games, hold markets, make their own crafts, work in their own mines, and grow their own food.

They have their own animals, such as horses, dogs, and cattle, and they make use of various wild animals, such as deer and goats. Their crafts include spinning, weaving, grinding meal, cooking, baking, and churning, metalworking, leatherworking, tailoring, and boat-building. They love music and dancing, at which they excel far beyond what any human can hope to accomplish. They hunt and conduct wars, both between themselves and against human kingdoms. They play various ball games, including football and hurling. They are masters of the game of fidhcheall , generally believed to be similar to chess, but also play cards and dice.

Their natural food, even among the aristocrats and the gentry, consists of barley meal, deer or goat milk, butter and cheese made from such, and the roots, leaves, and stalks of weeds, all of which are disguised and spiced by glamour. The exception seems to be the small, delicious cakes the gentry and rustics give to their benefactors. Yet they have a curious dependency upon humans, as is witnessed by the things they steal from people, particularly food.

When discussing the question of Faerie habitation, we must distinguish between where Faeries are found and where they live. Faeries can be found anywhere. Aristocratic Trooping Faeries inhabit mounds, caves, and other underground areas; the sea and large lakes; off-shore islands; above the clouds; and even the air itself. The gentry and the rustics can inhabit under ground or under water, but mostly they tend to inhabit the wilderness just beyond human towns and villages, such as woods, fields, hedgerows, glens, mountains, and rocky clefts. Others inhabit human funerary monuments such as dolmen and tumuli, or rings of standing stones, or mushroom rings.

Domesticated Solitary Faeries can be found in or under houses or out-building, in the fields or orchards, or simply within the confines of human-dominated land. Wild Solitary Faeries can be found in any natural habitat, no matter how small or mean, and even inhabit trees and flowers. In all these places, they build for themselves some form of dwelling, which is as opulent or as simple as they need it to be. And yet, in any real sense of the word, Faeries only live in Faerieland. Those locations in our world where we encounter them are simply the places into which they incur.

Their dwellings are pockets of Faerieland that have protruded into our world, and which act as portals to allow Faeries and humans to cross from one to the other. Even so, the vast majority of Faeries and humans are unable to cross at will, but must wait until the barriers between worlds weaken or break down entirely. This happens not infrequently, and the strength of the barriers fluctuates on daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly cycles. However, periods when the barriers are weak enough to permit crossovers are few and far between, and occur at irregular intervals, with two exceptions: the nadir and zenith of the Irish year.

At Samhain November 1st and Beltene May 1st , the barriers virtually collapse, allowing beings from either world to cross into the other. But being as Beltene is the festival of light and rebirth, most denizens of Faerieland are repelled by it and so avoid our world at that time. Not so with Samhain — Hallowe'en — when the Faeries travel openly and freely through our world during the three days of the festival. Though Faerieland is often depicted as a duplicate of Earth, except either more beautiful or more horrific, there is one major difference: time passes at different rates in the two worlds.

Though a few legends and folktales tell of visitors to Faerieland spending a year there, only to discover that just an hour passed on Earth, it is usually the other way around. It is not uncommon to hear about someone who has spent an hour dancing inside a Faerie mushroom ring discovering that a year has passed outside; or about a captive held for a week inside a Faerie mound discovering that seven years has passed when he is released; or a hero living with a Faerie maiden on a Faerie island for six months discovering that four hundred years have passed on Earth.

And there is no single standard for time conversion; time in Faerieland is as mercurial as the Faeries themselves. Faeries have numerous powers, being supernatural creatures, but not all Faeries have the same powers, or can wield them with the same strength. The Heroic Faeries have nearly complete control over time and space, whereas the smallest of the rustic Faeries are at the mercy of their human captors. Even so, it can be dangerous to anger even the weakest of Faeries, because one power they all share is the ability to bestow continual good fortune on those who please them or do them favors, and continual bad luck on those who upset them.

Another power all Faeries share is glamour , the magic of illusion, whereby they can make people see whatever they wish them to see, or not see whatever they do not wish them to see. The aristocrats can create whole kingdoms with this power, whereas the smallest rustics can at least become invisible. Akin to this is the ability to mislead people by hiding or changing the appearance of familiar landmarks, or disguising treacherous ground to make it appear safe.

Shape-shifting is also based on this power, and most Faeries have the ability to transform themselves into any form they desire, or to make themselves appear as tiny or as huge as they wish. Most Faeries also have some control over the weather and the seasons. At the very least, they can cause blight on plants and illness in animals and humans. In fact, Faeries can cause illness , injury, and even death using the "Faerie stroke" , a kind of weapon that they can direct at an enemy. Similarly, however, Faeries can also heal injuries and cure the sick when they wish to.

The ability to cause sickness and injury also explains another power, the ability to steal the toradh , or nutritional goodness, from food. This can be done in a number of different ways, such as mystically removing it, leaving only a husk, or actually destroying it, such as burning a barn full of wheat. The weaker Faeries will even steal the food outright, either invisibly or in the guise of vermin. A common power, though usually restricted to the Trooping Faeries, is levitation and flight.

This is also accomplished by a number of different means. One way was to recite a spell or magical phrase, such as "Horse and Hattock! However, most Faeries require some sort of apparatus, such as ragwort stalks and magical caps. Humans can sometimes join the Faeries in their flying revels, and sometimes they snatch unwilling humans and carry them along, either to be taken to Faerieland or dumped in some far away country.

Faeries are also able to levitate objects as well as themselves or people, anything from dishes to whole buildings. Perhaps the most basic power is the ability to influence fertility. Though this is reflected in a number of the powers described earlier, their interest in fertility, particularly agriculture and human love, is part of their nature. Many stories describe in general terms how a farmer who honors his Good Neighbors prospers because the Faeries watch over his crops, animals, and family, protecting and nurturing them, whereas a farmer who dishonors them comes to ruin because the Faeries attack his crops, animals, and family, blighting and killing them.

Faerie morality is at once familiar and bizarre. Faeries tend to react in an exaggerated fashion to acts of minor significance, bestowing a lavish reward for a small kindness while doling out an equally lavish punishment for a small offense. They also demand adherence to rules and taboos that conflict with human nature and often contradict one another.

Even so, for the most part, the virtues esteemed by Faeries are also esteemed by humans, and the faults condemned by Faeries are also condemned by humans. In fact, it can be argued that Faerie morality reflects that of an insular human pastoral community, wherein the virtues encourage harmonious neighborly relations, while the faults discourage them. Like humans, there are good and evil Faeries, called the Seelie Court and Unseelie Court , respectively. The members of the Seelie Court can be dangerous if offended, but the primary difference between these two groups is that the Unseelie Court is never under any circumstance favorable to humans.

Its chief pleasure is to harm or distress people, and while its members can have a sense of gratitude, it can be just as dangerous to befriend them as offend them. They are wholly hostile to mankind, and the best way to deal with them is to avoid them altogether. The members of the Seelie Court, on the hand, are kindly disposed, or at least neutral, towards humans who obey their laws.

They are not without kindly impulses, and are capable of gratitude: they readily reward any kindness done to them, no matter how small, and show their approval of any conduct they deem admirable. Typical rewards include gifts of food, inexhaustible supplies of grain or flour, perpetual good health and fortune, or even being saved from danger or death.

For the most part, people expect good Faeries to be helpful and fair, to return what they borrow, to patronize true love, to enjoy music and dancing, and to take a keen interest in fertility, neatness, order, and beauty. Even the members of the Unseelie Court do not lie, they just equivocate. Among themselves, Faeries adhere to an extremely strict code of conduct that forbids dishonesty and stealing. Only infidelity is generally tolerated, being as Faeries are notorious for being amorous. With regards to humans, however, they seem to believe they are entitled to take whatever they need.

Katharine Briggs has stated that their motto seems to be, "All that's yours is mine and all that's mine is my own. Nor do they stop at animals: Faeries will gladly kidnap babies, children, beautiful maidens, and nursing mothers, as well as poets, musicians, and handsome young men. Yet Faeries become furious if humans steal from them, and while they delight in playing tricks on people, when the joke is on them they usually do not take it in good humor. As well, even among the good Faeries, their kindness is often capricious, and their goodwill can be embarrassing, even distressing; it is not unusual for Faeries to enrich a friend by stealing from his neighbors.

And there is very little mercy mingled with their justice. The best way to win the favor of the Faeries is to practice what they honor and avoid what they hate.

The Books of Faerie: Molly's Story #3

Faeries expect people to be generous and fair in their dealings, and to keep their promises. Truthfulness in word and deed, and gentle, courteous manners are all esteemed, as is readiness to perform an act of kindness , such as feeding a stranger, lending a measure of oatmeal, or suckling an infant. The exception seems to be the small, delicious cakes the gentry and rustics give to their benefactors. Yet they have a curious dependency upon humans, as is witnessed by the things they steal from people, particularly food.

When discussing the question of Faerie habitation, we must distinguish between where Faeries are found and where they live. Faeries can be found anywhere. Aristocratic Trooping Faeries inhabit mounds, caves, and other underground areas; the sea and large lakes; off-shore islands; above the clouds; and even the air itself. The gentry and the rustics can inhabit under ground or under water, but mostly they tend to inhabit the wilderness just beyond human towns and villages, such as woods, fields, hedgerows, glens, mountains, and rocky clefts. Others inhabit human funerary monuments such as dolmen and tumuli, or rings of standing stones, or mushroom rings.

Domesticated Solitary Faeries can be found in or under houses or out-building, in the fields or orchards, or simply within the confines of human-dominated land. Wild Solitary Faeries can be found in any natural habitat, no matter how small or mean, and even inhabit trees and flowers. In all these places, they build for themselves some form of dwelling, which is as opulent or as simple as they need it to be. And yet, in any real sense of the word, Faeries only live in Faerieland.

Those locations in our world where we encounter them are simply the places into which they incur. Their dwellings are pockets of Faerieland that have protruded into our world, and which act as portals to allow Faeries and humans to cross from one to the other. Even so, the vast majority of Faeries and humans are unable to cross at will, but must wait until the barriers between worlds weaken or break down entirely. This happens not infrequently, and the strength of the barriers fluctuates on daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly cycles.

However, periods when the barriers are weak enough to permit crossovers are few and far between, and occur at irregular intervals, with two exceptions: the nadir and zenith of the Irish year.

At Samhain November 1st and Beltene May 1st , the barriers virtually collapse, allowing beings from either world to cross into the other. But being as Beltene is the festival of light and rebirth, most denizens of Faerieland are repelled by it and so avoid our world at that time. Not so with Samhain — Hallowe'en — when the Faeries travel openly and freely through our world during the three days of the festival.

Though Faerieland is often depicted as a duplicate of Earth, except either more beautiful or more horrific, there is one major difference: time passes at different rates in the two worlds. Though a few legends and folktales tell of visitors to Faerieland spending a year there, only to discover that just an hour passed on Earth, it is usually the other way around. It is not uncommon to hear about someone who has spent an hour dancing inside a Faerie mushroom ring discovering that a year has passed outside; or about a captive held for a week inside a Faerie mound discovering that seven years has passed when he is released; or a hero living with a Faerie maiden on a Faerie island for six months discovering that four hundred years have passed on Earth.

And there is no single standard for time conversion; time in Faerieland is as mercurial as the Faeries themselves. Faeries have numerous powers, being supernatural creatures, but not all Faeries have the same powers, or can wield them with the same strength. The Heroic Faeries have nearly complete control over time and space, whereas the smallest of the rustic Faeries are at the mercy of their human captors.

Even so, it can be dangerous to anger even the weakest of Faeries, because one power they all share is the ability to bestow continual good fortune on those who please them or do them favors, and continual bad luck on those who upset them. Another power all Faeries share is glamour , the magic of illusion, whereby they can make people see whatever they wish them to see, or not see whatever they do not wish them to see. The aristocrats can create whole kingdoms with this power, whereas the smallest rustics can at least become invisible.

Akin to this is the ability to mislead people by hiding or changing the appearance of familiar landmarks, or disguising treacherous ground to make it appear safe.

Snow Faerie

Shape-shifting is also based on this power, and most Faeries have the ability to transform themselves into any form they desire, or to make themselves appear as tiny or as huge as they wish. Most Faeries also have some control over the weather and the seasons. At the very least, they can cause blight on plants and illness in animals and humans. In fact, Faeries can cause illness , injury, and even death using the "Faerie stroke" , a kind of weapon that they can direct at an enemy.

Similarly, however, Faeries can also heal injuries and cure the sick when they wish to. The ability to cause sickness and injury also explains another power, the ability to steal the toradh , or nutritional goodness, from food. This can be done in a number of different ways, such as mystically removing it, leaving only a husk, or actually destroying it, such as burning a barn full of wheat. The weaker Faeries will even steal the food outright, either invisibly or in the guise of vermin. A common power, though usually restricted to the Trooping Faeries, is levitation and flight.

This is also accomplished by a number of different means. One way was to recite a spell or magical phrase, such as "Horse and Hattock! However, most Faeries require some sort of apparatus, such as ragwort stalks and magical caps. Humans can sometimes join the Faeries in their flying revels, and sometimes they snatch unwilling humans and carry them along, either to be taken to Faerieland or dumped in some far away country. Faeries are also able to levitate objects as well as themselves or people, anything from dishes to whole buildings.

Perhaps the most basic power is the ability to influence fertility. Though this is reflected in a number of the powers described earlier, their interest in fertility, particularly agriculture and human love, is part of their nature. Many stories describe in general terms how a farmer who honors his Good Neighbors prospers because the Faeries watch over his crops, animals, and family, protecting and nurturing them, whereas a farmer who dishonors them comes to ruin because the Faeries attack his crops, animals, and family, blighting and killing them. Faerie morality is at once familiar and bizarre.

Faeries tend to react in an exaggerated fashion to acts of minor significance, bestowing a lavish reward for a small kindness while doling out an equally lavish punishment for a small offense. They also demand adherence to rules and taboos that conflict with human nature and often contradict one another. Even so, for the most part, the virtues esteemed by Faeries are also esteemed by humans, and the faults condemned by Faeries are also condemned by humans. In fact, it can be argued that Faerie morality reflects that of an insular human pastoral community, wherein the virtues encourage harmonious neighborly relations, while the faults discourage them.

Like humans, there are good and evil Faeries, called the Seelie Court and Unseelie Court , respectively. The members of the Seelie Court can be dangerous if offended, but the primary difference between these two groups is that the Unseelie Court is never under any circumstance favorable to humans. Its chief pleasure is to harm or distress people, and while its members can have a sense of gratitude, it can be just as dangerous to befriend them as offend them.

They are wholly hostile to mankind, and the best way to deal with them is to avoid them altogether. The members of the Seelie Court, on the hand, are kindly disposed, or at least neutral, towards humans who obey their laws. They are not without kindly impulses, and are capable of gratitude: they readily reward any kindness done to them, no matter how small, and show their approval of any conduct they deem admirable. Typical rewards include gifts of food, inexhaustible supplies of grain or flour, perpetual good health and fortune, or even being saved from danger or death.

For the most part, people expect good Faeries to be helpful and fair, to return what they borrow, to patronize true love, to enjoy music and dancing, and to take a keen interest in fertility, neatness, order, and beauty. Even the members of the Unseelie Court do not lie, they just equivocate. Among themselves, Faeries adhere to an extremely strict code of conduct that forbids dishonesty and stealing. Only infidelity is generally tolerated, being as Faeries are notorious for being amorous. With regards to humans, however, they seem to believe they are entitled to take whatever they need.

Katharine Briggs has stated that their motto seems to be, "All that's yours is mine and all that's mine is my own. Nor do they stop at animals: Faeries will gladly kidnap babies, children, beautiful maidens, and nursing mothers, as well as poets, musicians, and handsome young men. Yet Faeries become furious if humans steal from them, and while they delight in playing tricks on people, when the joke is on them they usually do not take it in good humor.

As well, even among the good Faeries, their kindness is often capricious, and their goodwill can be embarrassing, even distressing; it is not unusual for Faeries to enrich a friend by stealing from his neighbors. And there is very little mercy mingled with their justice. The best way to win the favor of the Faeries is to practice what they honor and avoid what they hate. Faeries expect people to be generous and fair in their dealings, and to keep their promises.

Truthfulness in word and deed, and gentle, courteous manners are all esteemed, as is readiness to perform an act of kindness , such as feeding a stranger, lending a measure of oatmeal, or suckling an infant. They prefer persons to give straightforward answers to straightforward questions, and they expect appreciation for the gifts they bestow.


  • Operators, Geometry and Quanta: Methods of Spectral Geometry in Quantum Field Theory (Theoretical and Mathematical Physics)?
  • Comic The Books of Faerie: Molly's Story issue 3.
  • Trial by Ordeal: A Life or Death Method of Judgement | Ancient Origins.
  • Days of Corn Tortillas?
  • The Book Of Plays!
  • Snow Faerie | Duel Masters Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia.

An hospitable nature is especially prized, particularly towards them: when they come to a house, they expect it to be made welcome for them by being neat and orderly, with a clear fire in a freshly swept hearth, and a bowl of fresh water set out beside an offering of milk, bread, and cheese. Yet they also want humans to be close and private , fond of solitude and contemplation, and able to keep secrets. Open, loving, free people are dear to them, and they cherish merriment, cheerfulness, celebration, and good fellowship.

Faeries dislike boasters , braggarts, and babblers. Meanness , rudeness , and selfishness are unpopular with them, as is slovenliness , sluttishness, ill-temper, and bad manners. Gloominess is shunned, and to thank them for a gift is a breach of etiquette. However, the worst crime of all is to infringe on their privacy. They hate anyone who betrays their secrets, and they also hate inquisitive people who spy on them and clumsy oafs who break into their revels without permission. Trespassers onto their land or mounds are severely punished, even if the encroachment was accidental, and it is best to avoid using their roads when they are on the move.

Faerie gifts are given in secret, and anyone who talks about them will lose them. If a human does find himself the target of Faerie malice, there are ways he can protect himself. Faeries are essentially pagans and tend to be superstitious; most can be held at bay by religious objects or rituals. Sacred symbols such as the cross are often effective, not just because of its religious significance, but also because it represents the purifying light of the sun. Faeries are not afraid of or harmed by the sun, but its symbology as a giver of life is inimical to their status as beings of the dead.

Similarly, Christ's conquest of death on the cross can be seen as a repudiation of the Faerie lifestyle. Even making the sign of the cross can be effective, and after the triumph of Christianity, Christian symbols were accepted as shields against the evil Faeries of the Unseelie Court. These include saying prayers or singing hymns, sprinkling or carrying Holy Water, and even carrying churchyard mold.

Bread and salt are also effective, being as they have been regarded as sacred ever since primitive times, and as with the sun are symbols of life. Other protective means include ringing bells , whistling, and snapping clappers.

war and after | WMG Publishing

Travelers who believe they are being mislead can turn their coats inside out, in an attempt to change their identity, and people being chased by Faeries can leap to safety across fresh running water. Self-bored stones , which have holes in them created by running water, not only allow a person to see through glamour by looking through the hole , but also protect animals and people from being taken. A number of different plants and herbs are also useful as counter-charms. The shamrock, or four-leafed clover, is the most powerful, because it breaks Faerie glamour.

John's wort and red verbena protect against magic in general, while daisies can prevent children from being kidnapped. The wood or red berries from rowan or ash trees do much the same for adults. Yet by far the most potent protective measure is iron , especially cold-wrought iron implements, which are created by beating raw iron instead of melting and casting it.

Steel, the primary alloy of iron, is also effective. There is no certain answer why Faeries should fear it. One suggestion is that Faeries consider iron-working to be uncanny, a form of magic only humans can do. While possible, it would seem unlikely, because Faeries are master smiths, and they would be familiar with metalworking. Another possibility is based on the fact that iron is considered to be representative of life.

As such, like bread or the cross, it also would symbolize a concept inimical to the Faeries. Whatever the reason, anything made of iron or steel, including horseshoes, knives, and scissors, can be used to keep Faeries at bay.